Abstract Art and Photography: the Shape of Light at the Tate

Abstract Art and Photography: the Shape of Light at the Tate
#Exhibitions

Abstract art and photography are intertwined in a fascinating story that has yet to be investigated fully until today. Helping to sift through it at the Tate Modern are around 300 works created by more than 100 artists, from the first decade of the 1900s to the advent of the digital age. The most innovative photography is juxtaposed with celebrated paintings and sculptures in a comparison that sheds new light on all these mediums - the Cubist painting of George Braque and the photos of Pierre Dubreuil, the Abstract Expressionism of Jackson Pollock and the luminograms of Otto Steinert, the exquisite corpse of the Surrealists and the Distorsions of André Kertesz. In the middle of it all, the work of transversal geniuses like Man Ray and Làzlò Moholy-Nagy demonstrate the short circuit between media and varying languages. Man Ray himself was one of the protagonists of The Sense of Abstraction, the pioneering exhibition that, in 1960, showed the public of the MoMa the power of abstract photography - within the itinerary at the Tate, original works and photos of that famous break-through exhibition offer a glimpse of the crucial event. Passing through Optical experiments and Kinetic Art, the exhibition arrives at the present day with works by celebrated artists like Barbara Kasten and Thomas Ruff, as well as new works by AntonyCairns, Maya Rochat and Daisuke Yokota.
Francesca Grego - © 2018 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London