Anni Albers: the Feminine Side of the Bauhaus

Anni Albers: the Feminine Side of the Bauhaus
#Exhibitions

Just a few months from the 100th Anniversary of the Bauhaus, the Tate Modern pays homage to an exceptional exponent of the School of Wiemar - outside the canons of the age, Anni Albers set out new, promising paths for design and carried her studies of Modernism into unknown territory. She would have studied to be a painter if the masculine mentalities that surrounded hadn’t impeded her. Instead, she became a true artist of textiles. The exhibitions testifies to the fact with sketches, upholstery, jewellery, fabrics designed for industry and the celebrated “pictorial weaves”, but also the innovative ideas expressed in writings and publications, such as that on the connection between architects and the “inventive weaver”. Student of Paul Klee, close to Wassily Kandinsky, wife of painter Josef Albers, Anni tore down the confines between art and artisans, manual practices and mechanised production, ancient and modern. Through 350 objects, the exhibition at the Tate Modern retraces her steps from Germany to the United States, where she taught for 15 years in the lively environment of the Black Mountain College. Up close, her creative processes and numerous sources of inspiration - a personal geography of art that moved from Asia to Africa to Latin America, where Albers travelled extensively, collecting artefacts and emerging herself in cultures which would influence her subsequent work profoundly. Finally, the exhibition offers the drawings and prints from the last part of her career, which still inspire artists and designers worldwide today.

Francesca Grego - © 2018 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London