At the National Gallery, an Exhibition Gives New Perspectives on Lucian Freud

At the National Gallery, an Exhibition Gives New Perspectives on Lucian Freud
#Exhbitions

“I use the gallery as if it were a doctor. I come for ideas and help - to look at situations within paintings, rather than the whole paintings. Often these situations have to do with arms and legs, so the medical analogy is actually right.” Lucian Freud spoke thus of his visits to the National Gallery, with which he always had a strong bond. And now, one-hundred years from the artist’s birth, the London gallery pays homage to this giant of British figurative painting, reuniting, in an exhibition, the most important works created during the seventy years of work by the master who sought to make his paintings “astonish, disturb, seduce, convince”. From the first works, such as Girl with Roses in the 1940s, to the last celebrated pieces, such as the The Brigadier, 2003-2004 (private Collection), the exhibition, from the 1st of October to the 22nd of January, offers new perspectives on the art of Freud, concentrating on his tireless and incessant commitment to the medium of painting. But, above all, it offers an opportunity to reconsider the creations of the artist in the broader context of the tradition of European painting. In the atelier of Freud, spattered with paint, The Credit Suisse Exhibition – Lucian Freud: New Perspectives will surprise the guests of the National Gallery with painting which astutely reflects the history of art, from portraits of subject wearing flowers in the manner of Hans Holbein, to the couples holding hands which are reminiscent of the “friend” portraits of the Renaissance, in this journey in five sections, comprised of works on loan from museums and private collections from around the world.

Samantha De Martin - © 2022 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London