The Enigmas of De Chirico at the Palazzo Reale

The Enigmas of De Chirico at the Palazzo Reale
#Exhibitions

It was 1970 the last time there was a Giorgio De Chirico exhibition at the Palazzo Reale. Almost fifty years after the historic monographic exhibition curated by Franco Russoli, the Pictor Optimus is at the centre of a grand return to Piazza Duomo. More than one-hundred masterpieces are being brought together to illustrate every phase of the artist’s career - they are on loan from the Tate Modern in London and the Guggenheim Collection in Venice, as well as important collections in Milan - the Museo del Novecento, the Pinacoteca di Brera, Villa Necchi Campiglio and the Casa Museo Boschi di Stefano - but also from the United States and even Brazil. In Milan, they are on display in a surprising itinerary broken down into eight sections. From his classical roots traced back to his infancy when De Chirico lived on the Greek island of Volos, to the avant-garde scene in Paris, leading up to the invention of his Metaphysical painting, capable of bewitching in equal parts the Surrealists and Andy Warhol, the exhibition offers an iconic universe inhabited by mannequins, knights, odd town squares, still lifes full of mystery, even strangely disturbing at times. While mythological imagery, always a strong presence in the works of the artist, is best depicted in his youthful masterpiece The Dying Centaur, the enigmas of his truly original painting style are readily found in fascinating yet troubling works such as Le Printemps de l’Ingénieur, Metaphysical Interior (with Lighthouse), Disturbing Muses, Hermetic Melancholy, The Prodigal Son - paintings looking at “the demon in everything” because, as the artist said, “We are explorers ready for other departures.”
Francesca Grego - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Milano