Cézanne, the Man and Artist, on Display at the Tate

Cézanne, the Man and Artist, on Display at the Tate
#Exhibitions

“The greatest of us all.” That’s how Monet defined Paul Cézanne, the cornerstone of modern painting who gave permission to generations of artists to break the rules. This autumn, the Tate Modern pays homage to the painter from Aix-en-Provence with an exhibition of paintings, water colours and drawings, works created in a world of rapid acceleration, profoundly infused with the quotidian and the personal experiences of the artist. Around 80 carefully-selected works, on loan from European, Asian and United States collections, offer the public of the United Kingdom the first chance, in over 25 years, to get a collective glimpse of Cézanne’s career. Just step over the threshold of the Tate and stroll through still lifes and landscapes of Provence, be amazed by portraits and scenes of bathers, admiring around twenty works on display for the first time ever in the United Kingdom, such as The Apple Basket, Mont Sainte-Victoire (from the Philadelphia Museum of Art) and Still Life with Coffee-Maker, Melon and Sugar Bowl (1900-1906), on loan from a private collection. A new study on the colours, composition and techniques applied to these works will reveal the audacious approach of the painter, challenging conventions to go on to influence even modern painters. The public will rediscover the story of a young ambitious painter, his friendship wth Camille Pissarro, his involvement with Impressionism and his following departure from the Parisian art scene to make his own way. The itinerary will follow the artistic development of the painter, from his earliest paintings, such as the surprising Portrait Scipione (1866-1868) from the San Paolo Museum of Art and the works created during the last months of his life, such as The Sitting Man (1905-1906) from the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid.

Samantha De Martin - © 2022 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London