Milton Avery, the Wizard of Colour

Milton Avery, the Wizard of Colour
#Exhibitions

In the paintings of Milton Avery, “the poetry of colour has penetrated every pore of the canvas, up to the last brushstroke.” Those are the words of Mark Rothko, a person who decidedly knew something about colours. Chronologically mid-way between Impressionism and Abstract Expressionism, Avery was able to develop a totally originally language and, today, is considered one of the great “colourists” of the XX Century. “Only Matisse - to whose art he obviously owed a great deal - was able to create greater results in this direction,” declared the New York Times. However, in Europe, Avery was never honoured with a complete retrospective. This summer, the Royal Academy of Art will seek to fill this void with an exhibition which spans his entire career. It will feature his most celebrated works, created between the ‘30s and ‘60s - portraits, scenes of daily life, harmonious landscapes painted in Maine or in Cape Cod - but also works never displayed before, the works of his youth and testimonies to his final studies, highlighting the profound influence of modernist masters, Matisse firstly. Four sections to grasp the essence of a magic artist, unexplicably relatively-unknown to the public at large. Allow yourself to be surprised by his balance and sensitivity. At the end of the itinerary, it ties into Rothko and Barnett Newman, the first real unwavering fans of this wizard of colour.

Francesca Grego - © 2022 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London