An Intimate Andy Warhol

An Intimate Andy Warhol
#Exhibitions

More than 100 works reunited at the Tate Modern offer an overview of the career of Andy Warhol. And while the “father of pop” is known, above all, for multiple-copy works of Coca Cola and Marilyn Monroe, here are pieces on display that revolve around profound themes, such as desire, identity and belief. His personal story already, in itself, offers a serious reflection on his true depth. The man behind the artist was a very shy person, a homosexual born to Catholic immigrants from Czechoslovakia. Religion, therefore, as well as sexuality, represented a fertile and meaningful territory to explore for him in his work. Born Andrew Warhola, he started off drawing nude male figures. His very first works are placed in dialogue with the film Sleep from 1963 in which he documents his lover, the poet John Giorno, as he sleeps. The key pop works, such as the Marilyn Diptych, Elvis I and Elvis II are placed in relation to the most current issues of American politics and culture. One hall hosts various paintings from the series Ladies and Gentlemen which depicts people from New York’s transgender community, while the last works of the ‘80s, such as Sixty Last Suppers, seem to dialogue with his premature death and the Aids epidemic which was just starting to hit hard.
Vittoria Giusti - © 2020 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London