Art or Science Fiction? Heather Phillipson at the Tate Britain

Art or Science Fiction? Heather Phillipson at the Tate Britain
#Exhibitions

British artist Heather Phillipson transforms the monumental Duveen Galleries into a dystopic landscape - mutant creatures created with technological refuse colonise the spaces of the Tate Britain, thanks to an audacious project created on commission. Sounds, colours and moving installations comprise a “pre-post-historic environment”, as the artist herself likes to call it, provoking the most discordant sensations. Gas tanks of old airplanes, enormous hand-painted clouds, propane tanks ringing like church bells, animal eyes flashing on a screen and giant papier-maché rams are just a few of the apparitions ready to surprise guests. Different colours mark the passages into different territories, but the desired effect remains unchanged - “cultivate extraneousness to generate an ecstatic experience” continually on “the verge of collapse”. Among the numerous commissions considered for the neo-classical Duveen Galleries, Rupture No 1: Blowtorching the Bitten Peach is probably the one which brought about the most radical change. Exhibiting at the same time at the Fourth Plynth of Trafalgar Square with the project The End and at the Biennial of Shanghai with the installation Music for Rats, Phillipson merges video, sculpture, poetry and music in a vast multimedia works which she defines as experiments in quantum thought. “I’m pleased to have this ambitious project at the Tate Britain,” said the museum’s director Alex Farquharson, “Through a unique layering of images, stories and sounds, Heather Phillipson offers visitors an unforgettable experience. The parallel planet that she created encourages us to look at our own in a different light.”
Francesca Grego - © 2021 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London