At the Bastian Gallery, the “Polaroid Pictures” of Warhol

At the Bastian Gallery, the “Polaroid Pictures” of Warhol
#Exhibitions

The eccentric entourage of Andy Warhol’s Factory, an intimate portrait of New York in the ‘70s during the creation of a new visual arts cultural scene, is on display on the walls of the BASTIAN Gallery. With 60 portraits - which immortalise artists, actors, friends and politicians - Warhol is both subject and spectator, demonstrating his remarkable capacity as an attentive chronicler of his times. At the centre of the exhibition is Self-Portrait (1979), one of the few large-sized Polaroid portraits produced by the genius of Pop Art. In this piece, the face of the artist, grimacing as it comes in close to the lens itself, creates a rather intimate but jarring encounter with the spectator. Then there are plenty of friends, clients and folks hanging out at Studio 54, but also names like David Hockney, Jane Fonda, John Lennon, Richard Hamilton and Joseph Beuys. These are images that portray the start of an epoch and of a society defined by the image and illusion itself. The prolific production of Warhol reflects his continuous fascination with consumer culture. The Big Shot camera created by Polaroid and ideal for portraits, was adopted by the master in the early Seventies and he used it until his death in 1987.
Samantha De Martin - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London