At the National Gallery, the Baroque Room Re-Opens

At the National Gallery, the Baroque Room Re-Opens
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The Adorazione dei Pastori by Guido Reni is at the centre of Room 32, the largest at the National Gallery, drawing looks from visitors. Next to this large altar piece are the Ragazzo Morso da un Ramarro and La Cena di Emmaus and Salomè con la Testa di Giovanni Battista by Caravaggio, all in dialogue with masterpieces by Guercino, Artemisia, Orazio Gentileschi, a veritable symphony for the eyes. After 21 months of renovations, generously funded by Julia and Hans Rausing, to whom it is dedicated, Room 32, a treasure chest of Italian Baroque Art, returns to offer visitors to the National Gallery a look at its original decorative scheme by architect Edward Middleton Barry. During the course of the XX Century, multiple restorations altered its appearance significantly, but it is shown in its original state in a painting by Giuseppe Gabrielli (on loan to the National Gallery by the Government Art Collection) which offered precious details to the original aspects of the room, such as the skylight and the wood floor. The dark red wall, the friezes and lunettes featuring winged lions and dolphins, were restored capturing the original colours, just as the lunette dedicated to Titian, over the south door. Expanded in 2013, thanks to a donation of 25 paintings from art historian Sir Denis Mahon, the Baroque Collection has been enriched over time by masterpieces such as the Autoritratto di Artemisia Gentileschi nelle Vesti di Santa Caterina d'Alessandria, which came in 2018 and, in January of 2020, the imposing canvas of Il ritrovamento di Mosè by Orazio Gentileschi. Sublime as well is the Ritratto del Cardinale Marco Gallo by Giovanni Battista Gaulli, with its Italian frame from the XII Century.
Samantha De Martin - © 2020 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London