At the Royal Academy of Arts, the Renaissance Nude

At the Royal Academy of Arts, the Renaissance Nude
#Exhibitions

When, in 1541, Michelangelo completed his famed Universal Judgement in the Sistine Chapel, the sheer number of naked bodies depicted proved so controversial that Pope Pius IV commissioned Daniele da Volterra, also known as Braghettone, to hide the exposed parts under his artful drapery. The evolution of the nude, flourishing in Renaissance Europe and at the centre of The Renaissance Nude, is mapped out in this exhibition that explores its meaning in humanist culture and illustrates attitudes as well as the artistic sense of spirituality, focusing particularly on the years between 1400 and 1530. Starting with Christian art, with episodes out of both the Old and New Testaments, to the roles of the great patrons of the Renaissance, such as Isabella d'Este, the Marchioness of Mantua, from human vulnerability to studies of anatomy and proportion, the exhibition offers a journey in paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings and illuminated manuscripts. Visitors will be greeted by the Venere Anadiomene by Tiziano, on loan from the National Galleries of Scotland in Edinburgh, the San Sebastiano by Bronzino, Adam and Eve by Albrecht Dürer, as well as numerous drawings by Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael.
Samantha De Martin - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London