At the Tate Modern, a Journey through the World of Dora Maar

At the Tate Modern, a Journey through the World of Dora Maar
#Exhibitions

Many know her as the muse and companion of Pablo Picasso, but Dora Maar was much more. Photo-grapher, painter and member of the avant-garde, Henriette Theodora Markovitch made her way through the century, distilling the best it had to offer. At the Tate Modern, a refined retrospective does her justi-ce, retracing her life’s research. Among the highlights of the itinerary, the provocative photo-montages that became surrealist icons, but also images for publicity and print in which her taste for the unusual ushered in something decidedly fresh. And, of course, the documentation that Dora created around the genesis of Picasso’s Guernica, the collage-portraits created with the Spanish painter in a mix of photos and engravings, while he created celebrated paintings like the The Weeping Woman. Canvases from ex-clusive private collections and unseen photos open a window on the relationship between the two during the turbulent years of the war. Original nude photos and social documentaries created on the streets of Paris, London and Barcellona during the Great Depression show how Maar wasn’t shy about making herself heard, even in spheres typically dominated by men. Then, there are the abstract paintings after World War II, works created in obscurity and in total liberty, when Dora withdrew from art circles to dedicate herself to poetry and phi-losophy, before returning, in the Eighties, to her beloved darkroom.
Francesca Grego - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London