Gordon Matta-Clark at the David Zwirner Gallery

Gordon Matta-Clark at the David Zwirner Gallery
#Art

With performances that literally revolutionised the environs of the city, Gordon Matta-Clark transformed architecture into an art of structural clarification and spatial revelation while involving the urban community. An important figure in the New York art scene of the 1970s, who rethought architecture on paper, in films, performances and photography, responding to the needs of the community through a systematic process of deconstruction and, at the same time, suggesting alternatives to existing spaces, is at the centre of an exhibition at the David Zwirner Gallery with works created between 1970 and 1978. His first Garbage Wall, built in 1970 - a dwelling created with garbage collected right off the streets as an answer to the decline of the infrastructure in New York in those years - is an example of how Gordon Matta-Clark’s civic, artistic and architectural commitments all merged. Using architecture as a sculptural medium, the artist gave life to new structures, starting with buildings that were slated for demolition. The exhibition looks at a highly significant moment in the career of the American artist, from his first architectural experiments, such as Claraboya, presented through a series of photos that document the project from various panoramic perspectives, to a selection of recently remastered films.
Samantha De Martin - © 2018 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London