Illusions of Light - Olafur Eliasson at the Tate Modern

Illusions of Light - Olafur Eliasson at the Tate Modern
#Exhibitions

It was 2003 when Olafur Eliasson flooded the Turbine Hall of the quite new Tate Gallery with the dim light of a long dusk with The Weather Project. Today, the Danish artist returns to London with the largest monographic exhibition ever organised for him - around 30 works retrace his three-decade career, along with seven new works offering new sensorial experiences. “Seeing yourself sensing” is the mission of Eliasson who, through chromatic, light and olfactory stimuli, invites the public to reflect on its relationship with the surrounding environment. Lamps, projectors, mirrors and fans transform the space of the Tate Modern, gifting us with luminous perceptions - while Your Blind Passenger transfigures a long corridor by enshrouding us in a sea of coloured fog, Moss Wall parks an immense wall of Icelandic lichen in the usually aseptic, climate-controlled environs of the museum, while Rain Window gives the illusion of everlasting rain and Waterfall creates an artificial 11-metre-high waterfall right at the start of the itinerary. Even more surprising is the discovery that the effect is not the same for all visitors - some installations, in fact, can only be appreciated fully from quite precise positions in the gallery. And while the 450 prototypes of the Model Room offer an inside look at the creative work of the artist and his collaborators, The Expanded Studio shows Eliasson’s commitment to social and environmental themes with highly innovative objects and compelling installations like Ice Watch, composed of ice all the way from Greenland.
Francesca Grego - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London