Picasso and Paper at the Royal Academy of Arts

Picasso and Paper at the Royal Academy of Arts
#Exhibitions

From that of newspapers to that of napkins, even the decorative kind, torn, burnt, rendered three-dimensional, but, above all, sought out and purchased, even in Japan, paper represented an indispensable instrument for exploring ideas for Picasso. From January 25, an exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts looks at how this material was used by the great master through 300 works, including expressive drawings, imposing sculptures and even a colossal collage over four metres long, Femmes à Leur Toilette and a study for Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. The creative process of the artist is illustrated with a documentary film, but also through the studies for Guernica and the sketch books that hold the seeds of his revolutionary masterpieces. Letters, illustrated poetry and photographic collaborations with Dora Maar offer interesting glances at the life of the artist, while the paper works are contextualised, thanks to a select number of paintings and sculptures with which they are directly related. Among these, the great masterpiece of Picasso’s blue period, La Vie, which is displayed next to preparatory drawings and other works on paper that explore the theme of poverty, desperation and social alienation. The exhibition is organised by the Royal Academy of Arts in London and by the Cleveland Museum of Art in collaboration with the Musée National Picasso-Paris.
Samantha De Martin - © 2020 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London