The Eileen Agar Revolution at the Whitechapel Gallery

The Eileen Agar Revolution at the Whitechapel Gallery
#Exhibitions

“I spent my whole life rebelling against conventions, trying to bring colour and light and a sense of mystery to daily existence. You must be hungry for new colours, new forms and new possibilities for discovery.” Possibilities with which, dancing on the roofs of Paris, sharing ideas with Pablo Picasso or gathering star-fish on the beaches of Cornwall, Eileen Agar transformed daily life into something extraordinary. The unique style of the surrealist painter and photographer, who gracefully embraced painting, collage, sculpture and even ceremonial hats, mixing the abstract with images of classical art, the natural world and sexual pleasure, truly shines in the itinerary of the exhibition Angel of Anarchy at the Whitechapel Gallery. In the halls of the London gallery, the revolutionary career of Eileen gallops from the ’20 to the ‘90s. From the first works, the result of her experiments with Cubism, to her successive works of lyric abstraction, over 150 pieces on loan from important public and private collections, including recently discovered archival material, reveal Agar as one of the most dynamic, audacious and prolific figures of that generation which included Andre Breton, Dora Maar, Lee Miller and Man Ray. The title of the exhibition dedicated to the artist - who was a standout among British surrealists, experimenting with new techniques and materials, creating collages, objects and paintings from abstract organic forms - is an homage to Angel of Anarchy, one of her most celebrated works, created with various materials between 1936 and 1940.
Samantha De Martin - © 2021 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London