The Power of Women in a Pop-Punk Exhibition

The Power of Women in a Pop-Punk Exhibition
#Art

A celebrated Marvel character of the ‘80s inspires an exhibition dedicated to women - artist and curator Kelly-Anne Davitt was, in fact, thinking of She-Ra: Princess of Power when she decided to gather a rugged group of colleagues together. Her goal - coagulate experiences, languages, practices and different generations in a single voice, capable of expressing, in a unified manner, both the power of art and the power of women. The result is a collective exhibition full of irony and energy, where an irreverent Pop-Punk spirit runs through the paintings, sculptures, installations, videos and photographs. Naturally, the place of honour belongs to She-Ra, who proudly looms in the work of Davitt, ready to spring into action, standing in front of an apocalyptic back-drop. But as the exhibition unfolds, the further perspectives on feminine existence multiply. While the dense paintings of Hanne Jo Kemfor, inspired by photos of women in refugee camps, reminded some of the techniques of Goya, the provocative poetry of Salena Godden is expressed in an exhilarating “splatter” style video and Sara Pope uses her brush to evoke the shiny smoothness of advertising to challenge stereotypes. Next to Bette Davis who cracks up laughing in a drawing by Nina Mae Flower, the Virgin Mary shows up laden with grocery bags “like all mothers” in a work by Nancy Fouts. Eve herself is even there - she is naked, or faking to be, ready to rewrite history along with Clancy Gebler Davies.
Francesca Grego - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London