Van Gogh and England on Display at the Tate Britain

Van Gogh and England on Display at the Tate Britain
#Exhibitions

It’s been ten years since England has hosted so many paintings by Vincent Van Gogh: over 45 masterpieces are at the Tate Britain for a look at the relationship of the Dutch painter with London and Great Britain. It was here that Van Gogh spent three years of his youth, remaining impressed by life in a modern city, admired by the painting of masters like John Constable, enthusiastic for the new experiences offered by Anglo-Saxon culture. While the books of Charles Dickens influenced his style and themes throughout his career - it’s no coincidence that in his work Arlesienne, painted during the last years of his life, there is a copy of one of the author’s novels in the foreground - English graphic and print works were a true passion of Van Gogh and despite his economic limitations, he had a collection of around 2000 pieces. In the halls of the Tate, the Starry Night over the Rhone (1888), the self-portraits from the National Gallery of Washington and the Musée d’Orsay, a stunning version of the Sunflowers and the amazing Shoes from the Van Gogh Museum of Amsterdam are witness to a story that still needs to be told, along with The Rounds of the Prisoners from the Puškin Museum in Moscow, the only piece with a location in London, that of Newgate Prison. Compared alongside with the paintings of Van Gogh, we can admire British masters that inspired him - from Constable to Millais - but, above all, his heirs - painters like Francis Bacon, David Bomberg and the Camden Town Group, for whom his work was fundamental in pointing out the way towards ever-more original modern art.
Francesca Grego - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London