From Netsuke to Okimono, the Evolution of Miniature Art

From Netsuke to Okimono, the Evolution of Miniature Art
#Exhibitions

When, in the second half of the XIX Century, Japan decided to open up to the West, even adapting its dress, netsuke lost their function as clasps of the most varied forms and became okimono, objects of no more than aesthetic value, to model and show off. This evolution of the netsuke - which initially were used to tie tiny containers used as pockets to kimono belts - is the fil rouge of a voyage through the art and apparel of the Orient, offered to visitors by the Museo Poldi Pezzoli. The objects on display - part of Milano Asian Art 2019 - come from collections donated to the museum by Giacinto Ubaldo Lanfranchi. The first display contains a series of outfits including inro and netsuke, kiseruzutsu (pipe cases) and tonkotsu (tobacco pouches), as well as an ivory sculpture depicting a fisherman. Other displays depict the evolution of the netsuke, from its most ancient forms to the Meiji Era.
Samantha De Martin - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Milano