The Modern Life of Depardon Lights Up the Triennale

The Modern Life of Depardon Lights Up the Triennale
#Exhibitions

Modern life, immortalised by Raymond Depardon, rushes by in 300 photos and two films which illustrate just how, starting in the 1970s, the French photographer and film-maker profoundly changed the world of contemporary images. Created specifically for the spaces of the Triennale, the exhibition reveals how much of Italy there is in the work of the photographer and director who wandered both cities and the countryside, giving voice to the inhabitants he found and warming the world with his humanist gaze. Presented by the Triennale Milano and Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain, La Vita Moderna is the largest exhibition ever mounted for the artist. “A passenger of his times” as he liked to define himself, Depardon travelled from Chad to Lebanon, from North to South on the American continent, touching deserts and war-torn countries, preferring the real to the sensational. A young reporter with the Dalmas Agency, in 1966, he was one of the co-founders of the photo agency Gamma and, about ten years later, he began to collaborate with Magnum, of which, today, he is one of the founding members. Whether following a politician on the campaign trail or a farmer in their daily life, Depardon knows how to put himself aside, making way for his subject. Errance, the first series of the exhibition, acts as a through-line for the entire itinerary, among streets and landscapes which defy identification, a wanderer’s journey. In Glasgow, he loved to photography children and the homeless, in New York he captured the urban solitude and the individual indifference. His France, meanwhile, embraces the ordinary, from town squares to bars, from post offices to gas stations.
Samantha De Martin - © 2021 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Milano