Art or Furnishing? The Other Face of Impressionism Shows Itself at the Orangerie

Art or Furnishing? The Other Face of Impressionism Shows Itself at the Orangerie
#Exhibitions

“Painting walls was my life-long dream,” Edgar Degas once confessed. Despite appearances, interior design and painting en plein air went hand-in-hand with the experience of the Impressionists - this is revealed by an exhibition underway at the Musée de l’Orangerie, “home” to the series The Water Lillies by Claude Monet which, not by chance, is also known as the Grand Décoration. Eighty paintings, drawings, bas reliefs, ceramics and handcrafted fans from museums and collections from around the world are reunited at the Tuileries, to show us how, for the “painters of light”, art was made to please the eye and, above all, for “brightening up walls”, as Renoir always said. Along with him and Monet, illustrating this little-known but triumphant aspect of Impressionist painting at the Musée dell’Orangerie, are masters such as Degas, Berthe Morisot, Mary Cassatt, Paul Cézanne, Edouard Manet and Camille Pissarro. Whether they painted flowers or portraits, country landscapes or scenes of modern life, these artists put their talents to the test with every sort of object and surface, determined to bring a blast of beauty into everyday life.

Francesca Grego - © 2022 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Paris