The Odd Couple - Claude Monet and Joan Mitchell at the Fondation Louis Vuitton

The Odd Couple - Claude Monet and Joan Mitchell at the Fondation Louis Vuitton
#Exhibitions

An unexpected comparison lights up the Paris autumn - the protagonists are the master of Impressionism Claude Monet and the contemporary American artist Joan Mitchell, in a project born from a collaboration between the Fondation Louis Vuitton - which hosts the exhibition - and the Musée Marmottan Monet, which offers 25 masterpieces from the “painter of light”. That the final works of Monet - those of the Ninfee, to be more precise - in some way, were a precursor to Abstract Expressionism is not news - his works have been compared over time to the paintings of Jackson Pollock, Sam Francis, Mark Rothko and Gerhard Richter. However, the parallel with Joan Mitchell has something more to tell. In 1968, in fact, the American painter moved to the village of Vethéuil, where Monet lived and worked almost a century earlier. Here, Mitchell found herself immersed in the same natural settings and, struck by the power of the light and colour, developed an art comprised of gestural and energetic brushstrokes. Even the way of defining their own painting brings the two artists together, with Monet speaking of “sensations” and Mitchell of a “search for sentiments”. In the halls designed by Frank Gehry, the public can observe, up close, the affinities that unite this odd couple, with the famed Ninfee and the monumental Agapanthus Triptych of Monet, on loan from the United States and the ten paintings of the Grand Vallée by Mitchell, brought together just for this occasion.

Francesca Grego - © 2022 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Paris