Georgia O'Keeffe, between Nature and Eroticism, on Display at the Centre Pompidou

Georgia O'Keeffe, between Nature and Eroticism, on Display at the Centre Pompidou
#Exhibitions

The “cosmic” heights that envelop the immense plains of Texas stretch out, in the halls of the Centre Pompidou, along with rural landscapes, New York skyscrapers and the haylofts of Lake George. Here is the first retrospective in France dedicated to Georgia O’Keeffe, one of the greatest figures of North American art of the XX Century. For the generation of feminist artists of the Sixties, O'Keeffe was the “icebreaker”, offering an art that was no longer correlated to the gender of its creator. Around a hundred works, including drawings, paintings and photos, retrace the entire artistic output of the artist in a seamless itinerary. From the tight circle of the inventors of American modernism, O'Keeffe, the first woman artist to be included, in 1929, in the exhibitions at the MoMA, became, in the Sixties, a pioneer of a “hard edge” abstract painting style. And this itinerary keeps score perfectly, thanks to the support of the principal private and public international collections, mostly in North America. The exhibition opens with a space dedicated to the 291 Art Gallery, a decisive location in the career of Georgia O'Keeffe. Having moved to New York in 1918, the artist had the opportunity to discover the innovative movements of European modern art. Photographer Alfred Stieglitz, co-founder of the gallery and her future husband, organised the first American exhibitions of Auguste Rodin, Henri Matisse, Francis Picabia and Paul Cézanne, all of whom totally fascinated her. He was also the first to exhibit the drawings of Georgia, contributing to her public recognition and boosting her position in a rapidly expanding art market. Georgia O’Keeffe’s painting reinvented itself over the years. Inspiration drawn from the vegetable world is a recurring motif in her work and the exhibition at the Centre Pompidou highlights this, emphasising the ties with Romanticism.
Samantha De Martin - © 2021 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Paris