In the Theatre of Emotions. At the Musée Marmottan, a Journey through the Soul of the West

In the Theatre of Emotions. At the Musée Marmottan, a Journey through the Soul of the West
#Exhibitions

Today, art appears to us as the privileged seat of emotions. But was it always like this? Perhaps not, if we think of the cold detachment of Greek statues or the imposing faces of religious icons. Shedding light on this theme, today, is the Musée Marmottan, which gathers, in one exhibition, eighty works from prestigious private collections and international museums. From Albrecht Dürer to Jean-Honoré Fragonard, from Gustave Courbet to Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, the project is a journey through the history of sentiments and the way in which artists, in varying ways, observed them, translated them into images and staged them, just like the theatre. While in the 1800s, painter Louis-Leopold Boilly attempted to codify, in his Trente-Cinq Têtes d’Expression, all the known emotions, other great masters captured the soul of their subjects with ever-changing shades and resonance, paying homage to the infinite variety and uniqueness of human beings. At the Marmottan, an itinerary divided into eight sections shows the progression of art in discovering the world of emotions, parallel to the development of human society. Just as there have been more “reserved” epochs and more “expansive” ones, emotions themselves have been imbued with differing meaning over the ages - from the Renaissance Melencholia of Dürer to the neurasthenia depicted by Émile Signol, in the late 1800s, in Folie de la Fiancée de Lammermoor, from the manifestations of strength and heroism typical of historical and mythological paintings to the blind violence that strikes the viewer in some of Picasso’s paintings.
Francesca Grego - © 2022 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Paris