Julie Manet - the Memory of Impressionism Revealed at the Marmottan

Julie Manet - the Memory of Impressionism Revealed at the Marmottan
#Exhibitions

Niece of the great Edouard Manet and daughter of painter Berthe Morisot, Julie Manet was a creature of Impressionism. Losing both parents by the age of sixteen, she was tutored by symbolist poet Stéphane Mallarmé and had a close relationship with another giant of painting of that era, Pierre-Auguste Renoir. In the paintings of her mother, her uncle and Renoir, we see her face transform over time, from the rosy cheeks and golden locks of her infancy to the romantic and pensive beauty of a young woman possessing a natural elegance. But Julie was not only a model - she was also a painter, gathered, with her husband Ernest Rouart, a superb art collection and her diary offered a vivid look at the lives of the Impressionists. The story of the young Manet is now being told at the Musée Marmottan, which guards the paintings that Julie inherited from her mother. Three sections retrace the various phases of her existence and explore her multiple relations with art. Among the approximately 100 works on display, along with the paintings of the exhibition’s protagonist, are remarkable portraits by Berthe Morisot (Jersey Blue, Julie Rêveuse) and Renoir (L’enfant au Chat). Equally unforgettable is the section dedicated to the collecting of Julie, with paintings by Poussin, Fragonard, Delacroix, Corot, Degas, Gauguin and panels of Monet’s Water Lilies - in fact, Julie was among the first admirers of the large canvases from Giverny, among the very few people to buy them before the death of Michel, son and heir of the artist who donated an impressive number of pieces from the series to the Musée Marmottan.
Francesca Grego - © 2021 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Paris