Nomiyama's pictorial journey between realism and abstraction

Nomiyama's pictorial journey between realism and abstraction
#Exhibitions

Nomiyama Gyoji passed away a few months ago at the age of 102, after a long and fruitful life, an artist who established his unique style over the course of his long career, halfway between realism and abstraction and who is defined in Japan as "Western-Style Painting”. The exhibition will feature 7 works from the Ishibashi Foundation collection, including 3 works recently acquired and exhibited for the first time. Nomiyama was born in Honami, a former coal mining village that is now the city of Iizuka in Fukuoka Prefecture, in 1920. After graduating from the Tokyo Fine Arts School (now Tokyo University of the Arts), he enlisted in the army and was sent to fight in the Chinese region of Manchuria. After completing his military service in 1952 he went to Paris from where he returned 12 years later in 1964 after having deepened his research in the field of abstract art in France. In 1958 he received the Yasui Prize, a gateway to success for Western-style painters. Nomiyama is also known as a talented writer. He received the Japan Essayist Club award in 1978 for his work, Yonhyakuji no Dessan (A Drawing with Four Hundred Characters). As many of his schoolmates died during World War II, Nomiyama served as an advisor for Mugonkan, an art museum in Ueda, Nagano Prefecture, which exhibits paintings by art students who died in the war. He was a recipient of the Order of Culture and professor emeritus of the Tokyo University of the Arts.

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