British Baroque. Power and Illusion on Display at the Tate Britain

British Baroque. Power and Illusion on Display at the Tate Britain
#Exhibitions

The grandeur of British Baroque, with recent discoveries and never-before-seen works, explodes in the halls of the Tate. Many of these masterpieces are on loan from the grand estates for which they were originally conceived. Generally associated with the pomp and splendour of the courts of Europe, starting with that of Louis XIV, the Baroque also prospered in Great Britain, yet under different circumstances. In the Royal Court, the brilliant epicentre of the cultural life of the Nation, magnificence was used to express social status and power. Besides the exceptional works by artists such as Sir Peter Lely, Sir Godfrey Kneller and Sir James Thornhill, there are also works by lesser-known masters. The refined engravings of Grinling Gibbons and the drawings of Thornhill for the painted dome of Saint Paul’s Cathedral encounter the wonder and artifice of the still life and trompe l'oeil, the celebrated violin by Chatsworth, painted as if it were hanging on the back of a door, and the floral motifs of Simon Verelst, which were so real that they fooled diarist Samuel Pepys. The visually stunning Baroque architecture is represented by works from the great architects of the era, Wren, Hawksmoor and Vanbrugh. Architectural drawings, amazing prints and wooden models relating to important buildings of the period, such as the Hampton Court Palace, flank birds-eye views of these structures and their surroundings. There are also Baroque interiors, created to impress spectators with the taste and power of their noble owners.
Samantha De Martin - © 2020 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London