Shawanda Corbett, Well-Rounded Artist, at the Tate

Shawanda Corbett, Well-Rounded Artist, at the Tate
#Exhibitions

The fluid rhythms of jazz meet the ceramic works created by Shawanda Corbett with the techniques of Western Africa and Japan, while a set crossed by dancers invites the spectators at the Tate Britain to reflect on the human experience. To explore the notion of a “complete body”, Shawanda Corbett uses a well-rounded approach involving film, dance, photography and ceramics. Created specifically for the Tate Britain, the project Let the Sunshine In offers the first short film by the artist, accompanied by a jazz soundtrack and presented along with a new series of ceramic works. The intertwining of these elements is to illustrate the way in which people interact with each other and the spaces in which they live, offering a passionate reflection on the human experience. Totally re-inventing the traditional concept of performance, Corbett premiers at the Tate Britain, the theory of cyborgs, a concept dear to writer Donna J. Haraway who, in her Manifesto, carefully observes the way in which mechanical objects relate to human life. The performance also reflects on the ethics of artificial intelligence. The ceramic vases are in the unmistakable style of Corbett, borrowing from the ceramic techniques of Western Africa and Japan, as well as the fluidity of jazz music. In this way, the artist allows every form to take on its own personality, from the moment that the clay “finishes doing its thing forever” during the creative process. The resulting dialogue shows the interest of Corbett for the theatre of ancient Greece, the performances of which where documented through ceramic decorations.

Samantha De Martin - © 2022 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London