The "sacred plants" of Timur Si-Qin

The "sacred plants" of Timur Si-Qin
#Exhibitions

In Timur Si-Qin's production, individual history mixes with the vision of art. Born in Berlin and raised in a family of German Native Americans with Mongolian-Chinese roots, the artist is naturally led to seek new forms of spirituality to face climate change and the collapse of biodiversity. The works on display are the result of a trip Timur Si-Qin made to the Sichuan region in Western China near the Hengduan mountain range, near the Eastern edges of the Himalayas. It is a unique ecoregion which is also the cradle of six large rivers which downstream provide water for a third of the world's population. Hengduan boasts one of the highest levels of biodiversity, supporting the richest temperate endemic flora in the world. The Hengduan Mountains are covered in dense rhododendron forests with 223 different species and are home to over 20 different ethnic groups, making it one of the most culturally diverse regions in China. Research conducted by Timur Si-Qin shows how vital it is to protect areas like Hengduan to mitigate the serious impacts of global biodiversity loss. The works in this exhibition are iconographic and sacred representations of Hengduan plants. Images and artifacts that replace the image of the human figure commonly found in religious iconography with that of Hengduan's specific plants.

Viola Canova - © 2024 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Beijing