At the National Gallery, the Portraits of Gauguin

At the National Gallery, the Portraits of Gauguin
#Exhibitions

The interior dimension, the most intimate part of Gaugin emerges in a series of surprising portraits, moving and often disturbing, depicting friends, lovers, family members, executed over time and, sometimes, in various forms. These representatives of complex humanity are at the centre of an itinerary that, for the first time at the National Gallery, describe, through 50 works - paintings, sculptures and prints - the sense of the portrait for Gauguin - an instrument to tell of himself, his interior universe, but, most of all, the ideas of the painter about art itself. The result of important loans from museums and private collections around the world - from the Musée d'Orsay in Paris to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. and the National Museum of Western Art in Tokyo - sculptures in ceramics and wood, drawings and paintings show visitors the approach of the artist, characterised by his interest in materials uncommon in Western art and the use of intense colours, having an immense influence on future masters like Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. The exhibition at the National Gallery offers all the fascination of the artist for Breton and French Polynesia, that community far from industrialised Paris, close to nature and bursting with spirituality. From the first photos of the young artist to his last visit to the South Seas, the first gallery hall is dedicated to self-portraits. These also include the wrinkled and grotesque head with a thumb in its mouth - an evidence of the artist’s interest for iconography, non-Western art, experimentation in all its forms.
Samantha De Martin - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London