At the Victoria and Albert Museum, an Exhibition Celebrates Fabergé, the Czar’s Goldsmith

At the Victoria and Albert Museum, an Exhibition Celebrates Fabergé, the Czar’s Goldsmith
#Exhibitions

Gold and diamonds, enamel and rubies are the through-lines of a story of triumphs and rediscoveries, mixed with glamour, power and romanticism. For the first large exhibition dedicated to the legendary Russian goldsmith and his prestigious clients the Czars, the Victoria and Albert Museum offers 200 objects that retrace the story of Carl Fabergé and his company, recognised worldwide as an icon of elegance and Russian craftsmanship. Fabergé in London: Romance to Revolution presents unforgettable objects for luxury enthusiasts, such as the third Imperial Easter Egg of 1887, among the celebrated “missing” eggs created by Fabergé, considered lost for many years and recently rediscovered in a flea-market in the Midwest. In the traditional style of Fabergé, the egg contains a surprise - a woman’s watch by Vacheron Constantin, with an enamel face and gold watch hands mounted with diamonds. The egg was the first to be given by Emperor Alexander III to Empress Maria Feodorovna for Easter in 1887. Keep your eyes peeled and don’t miss the two rare human sculptures considered, after the Imperial Easter Eggs, the most ambitious creation by Fabergé, depicting the private body guards of the widowed Empress and Czarina, commissioned by Emperor Nicholas in 1912 and reunited for the first time for this exhibition after more than a century. Another marvel? Without a doubt, the peacock egg of 1907-1908, displayed in public for the first time in over ten years. A refined quartz sculpture with rocaille engravings, containing a surprise - an automaton of a peacock, perched amidst the branches of a gold-hued tree with enamel flowers and precious stones. The animal proudly opens its fanlike exquisite tail feathers.
Samantha De Martin - © 2021 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London