Between Painting and Engraving - Helen Frankenthaler, a Revolution of Wood and Colour

Between Painting and Engraving - Helen Frankenthaler, a Revolution of Wood and Colour
#Exhibitions

The free and airy painting of Helen Frankenthaler meets the art of woodcutting - the wood abandoning its rigidity to gather up fluid rushes of colour that transport the eye beyond the confines of what’s real. All this at the Dulwich Picture Gallery, in an homage to the protagonist of Abstract Expressionism who died ten years ago. On display, works never seen before in the United Kingdom, witness to a ceaseless desire to experiment - giant-format prints, unusual tools, such as a dentist drill and sandpaper, superimposed layers of colour, these are just a few examples of the innovations introduced by Frankenthaler to obtain the most diverse results imaginable, revitalising an ancient art and bringing it into the present. This exhibition in London includes the pioneering works of the Seventies and Eighties, as well as more recent works, reaching their apex in the triptych Madame Butterfly, considered by many the masterpiece of the artist, a work of over two metres in length, created with 46 blocks of wood and 102 colours, occupying an entire exhibition hall to do justice to its expressive lyricism. In another hall, meanwhile, Frankenthaler dialogues with an immense master of the past - Claude Monet, whose later works are often considered the precursors of abstract art itself. At the Dulwich Gallery, Monet’s Water Lilies and Agapanthus, on loan from the Musée Marmottan in Paris, offers us an evocative dialogue with the work Feather by the American artist.
Francesca Grego - © 2021 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London