Modern Society According to William Hogarth

Modern Society According to William Hogarth
#Exhibitions

Dipping his brushes in theatre and English literature, but, more than anything else, in the lives of people, William Hogarth captured the social changes of the mid-1700s in Europe, rich and cosmopolitan, creating brilliant paintings and satirical prints, full of humanity and wit. Altruists, poor, rich, egotistical and immoral folk became for the painter - also the illustrator of John Milton’s Paradise Lost - living sources of pictorial narratives which captured, over time, the imaginations of a varied public. The exhibition Hogarth and Europe offers visitors a leap into life in the London of the XVIII Century, immortalised by William Hogarth as well as other contemporary artists of his time who depicted the societies in Paris, Amsterdam and Venice. The painter who, at the start of the 1730s, created his first series of paintings, defined by himself as “modern moral subjects” with works dedicated to individual characters, of whom he analysed their rise and fall, will be at the Tate with an ample selection of works that visit every aspect of his varied career. Refined paintings with scenes touching upon themes relative to city life, customs, sexuality, corruption, patriotism and social integration, create an itinerary which is remarkably relevant today.
Samantha De Martin - © 2021 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London