Takis: When Science Becomes a Magic Art

Takis: When Science Becomes a Magic Art
#Exhibitions

Between the 1950s and ‘60s, Takis stunned the world by transforming the principals of electromagnetism into art, the physics of sound and light. After a seventy-year career spent between Paris, London and New York, the artist, originally from Greece, remains a pioneer, still capable of instilling wonder in even the most critical of spectators. This summer, his creations are at the Tate Modern for his largest exhibition ever in the United Kingdom - sculptures similar to antennae, objects inspired by radar, luminous and moving installations, machines that generate sound and even music but which are awaiting their cue from the public itself. With amusing and playful works including “monster-eyes” and “iron jungles”, it is also interesting to understand where Takis gathered the materials for his pieces - radio antennae stripped from military jeeps, rescue beacons from airplanes, pieces of oil tankers, bomb fragments - all were transformed into ingenious inventions in the artist’s hands, conquering the admiration of the likes of William Borroughs and Marcel Duchamp. It’s up to the visitor whether to simply let themselves be bewitched by apparently unexplainable wonders or seek out the mechanisms devised by the artist.
Francesca Grego - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London