Film Notes - How Classical Music Bewitched the Cinema

Film Notes - How Classical Music Bewitched the Cinema
#Music

Complex, refined, perfect but also with a universal emotional impact and capacity to communicate - classical music has often been chosen for soundtracks to film, giving life to some unexpected couplings. Several such examples are featured in the last event of the MITO Festival on stage at the Teatro Dal Verme. The festival has, once again, brought the music of the greatest composers to an ever-increasing public. This sonic journey into the world of cinema will be guided by the Orchestra del Teatro Regio of Turin directed by Sesto Quatrini with Giuseppe Albanese on piano and Sandro Angotti on trumpet. It all starts with the mesmerising Hungarian Dances N. 5 by Johannes Brahms who, in an unforgettable chapter of silent film, backs up the gestures of Charlie Chaplin in the film The Great Dictator. Then there’s Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky with Souvenir de Florence embellishing the soundtrack of The Gambler. The romantic notes of Aleksandr Borodin add colour to the adventure of 007 – The Living Daylights, while Dimitri Shostakovich plays with musical references - from Beethoven to Haydn, from yiddish folklore to his own music - in Concert for Piano in C minor, a chameleon-like and playful composition which shows just how close the Russian musician was to the world of cinema. “I want to defend the right to laugh within serious music. I wanted to compose music that was fun and of the highest quality at the same time,” he said regarding the piece, “When I see someone in the audience smile, it’s a true pleasure for me.”
Francesca Grego - © 2020 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Milano