From Ancient Greece to Augmented Reality - Art and Technology at the Gallerie Italia

From Ancient Greece to Augmented Reality - Art and Technology at the Gallerie Italia
#Exhibitions

There is a fine line connecting the red-figured Grecian urn created between 470-460 B.C., attributed to the Leningrad Painter, and the existential solitude of the melancholy subject of visual artist Ed Atkins, protagonist fo the video installation Hisser from 2015. An itinerary at the Gallerie Italia in Piazza della Scala explores the ways in which artists of different eras related to technology, with its charm and Utopian promises, but also its demons, anticipating or reflecting social and cultural changes. The dialogue between human subjectivity, art and technology can be found in the archaic concepts defined by the Greek terms téchne - ‘art in the sense of know-how, ability, craftsmanship’ - and logos, ‘word, discourse, reason’. There are more than 70 works on display, including works from, among others, the collections of Intesa Sanpaolo, the Rivoli Castle and the Fondazione Cerruti. While the works of the early 1900s, full of enthusiasm for the automobile, explored in the works of Balla and Boccioni, are represented by the paintings like Ricerca Astratta and Officine a Porta Romana, the post-war optimism for the conquest of new dimensions in the world of physics and the imagination itself, can be seen in works like Ambiente Spaziale by Lucio Fontana, but also with the exponents of Gruppo T, Programmed Art and Kinetic Art. Investigating the digital revolution and the development of augmented reality, the exhibition arrives at the latest generation of artists. Artists like Cécile B. Evans who, in his work In What the Heart Wants (2016), asks what it might mean to be a human being in the world of the future, completely digital, but bring the real world and the virtual world into perfect concert.
Samantha De Martin - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Milano