Power Station of Art, Ten Years of Gordon Matta-Clark

Power Station of Art, Ten Years of Gordon Matta-Clark
#Exhibitions

Known for his “cuts” applied to walls and entire buildings - which offer a reflection on the concepts of filling and emptying space in architecture - as well as his reflections on “anarchitecture”, Gordon Matta-Clark is at the centre of a highly-awaited exhibition at the Power Station of Art. The exhibition retraces the extraordinary works created between 1968 and 1978, with over 400 drawings, never-before-seen sketches, photographic works, films and archival documents. When he returned to New York, after having received a degree in architecture in 1968 from Cornell University, the architect saw that his city was undergoing an “urban renewal plan” and an overall economic transformation. Many old buildings were demolished, ghettos were razed to the ground and many were left homeless. The urban decay pushed Matta-Clark to dedicate himself to a series of practices that challenged modern urban planning and created temporary communities and autonomous spaces, as well as housing programs for those with lower incomes. His cuts - starting with abandoned buildings in the Bronx - are described by the artist as a sort of theatrical performance that attempts to reveal the fragility and instability of the buildings we live in, but also the complexity and sheer life concealed within them.

Samantha De Martin - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Shanghai