Don’t Call Them Selfies. Cindy Sherman at the National Portrait Gallery

Don’t Call Them Selfies. Cindy Sherman at the National Portrait Gallery
#Exhibitions

It was 1977 when twenty-three-year-old Cindy Sherman began working on her first full-scale photo series. Dressed up and made up like a character out of the cinema, she played herself at the centre of classic films and B-movies, Neo-Realist films and Hollywood yarns, giving way to her outrageously transformational talent. Without a care of upsetting icons like Greta Garbo, Hitchcock and Antonioni, the young artist from New Jersey explored the stereotypes of Western imagination, wearing them like costumes in an acrobatic balancing-act between truth and fiction. The times of “post-reality” were seemingly far off, but Sherman showed that she saw them coming even way back then. Today, that first success finally comes to the United Kingdom for the retrospective that celebrates the American photographer at the National Portrait Gallery. Approximately 180 works retrace the challenges of the last 40 years, with special attention given to the tiny black-and-white shots of Untitled Film Stills (1977-1980). From the History Portraits to the Sex Pictures and beyond, we relive the journey of an influential player of our times, who is still ready to surprise the public with a never-before-seen series as well. “Cindy Sherman’s art is totally original,” explains curator Paul Moorhouse, “Inventing fictitious characters and photographing herself in imaginary situations, Sherman lives in a world of pure appearance. No other artist explores the illusions of contemporary culture in such a penetrating way.”
Francesca Grego - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London