The Life of David Hockney in 150 Works

The Life of David Hockney in 150 Works
#Exhibitions

A generous and often affectionate point of view can be found in the works on display as part of David Hockney: Drawing from Life at the National Portrait Gallery. A look at art and life, starting in the 1950s and arriving in the present day with many never-before-seen works by one of Great Britain’s most celebrated living artists. The exhibition, featuring 150 works, was made possible by loans from around the world. However, they narrate the family life of the painter, his most intimate side. The subjects are his parents, the protagonists of My Parents and My Self, for example, or his life-long friend and, for a time, lover Gregory Evans, model and muse Celia Birtwell, simply Celia, and himself. His drawing technique not only sheds light on his ability as a portraitist and his capacity to portray the inner workings and beauty of those closest to him, but also his admiration for the Old Masters and the Modern Masters, from Hans Holbein to Henri Matisse to Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres. His works also reveal a unique way of observing the avant-garde and transforming it. One example is how he used Polaroids to create cubist-inspired collages.
Vittoria Giusti - © 2020 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London