At Buckingham Palace, the Collection of George IV

At Buckingham Palace, the Collection of George IV
#Exhibitions

According to a British saying, the worst sovereigns are those with the best taste. Extravagant, liberal and a big spender, within the norms of the 1800s, George IV was hardly the perfect picture of the ideal ruler, but he had a great instinct for art. Today, the Queen's Gallery celebrates his important role in building the Royal Collection. Within the stunning setting of Buckingham Palace, the paintings, drawings, furnishings, precious textiles, jewellery, books and French ceramics of the King, a lasting testimony to his culture and that of Europe as well. Taking in these beloved objects, we discover the life, tastes and personality of George IV, who was often at odds with the aristocracy of his times, and also the Royal Family. During his reign, Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle were transformed into avant-garde outposts in terms of the art on display - the King loved to change up the paintings quite often and he had a remarkable eye when it came to setting up displays of his cherished works of art. He had a real love for the Dutch and Flemish paintings of the 1600s - among his most important purchases, Landscape with Saint George and the Dragon by Rubens and the Triple Portrait of Charles I of England - another great collector - painted by Antoon van Dyck. Among contemporary works of the time, the Sovereign preferred the portraits of Thomas Lawrence and Thomas Gainsborough, the only common passion between he and his father, the rather serious George III.
Francesca Grego - © 2019 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel London