The Arteries of Beijing

The Arteries of Beijing
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An immense roadway with 10 lanes, traveled daily by thousands of people, lined with historic sites and city landmarks, to be admire both day and night thanks to a wonderful whirlwind of lights. The heart of this artery that divides the city along an East-West line for 46 km, starting at the Fuxing Road and going to the interstate of Jingtong, is Chang'an Jie, considered the most important road in all of China, whose name is derived from the ancient capital of China, now known as Xi’an. Along the main section of Chang'an Jie are important cultural institutions, such as the Chinese National Museum, Zhongshan Park, the National Centre for Theatre Arts and the Beijing Concert Hall. But the beating heart of this road is none other than Tiananmen Square with the famed gate that offers access to the Forbidden City. In fact, the construction of the “road of eternal peace” dates back to the Ming Dynasty, born along with the imperial city, between 1406 and 1420. Virtually as important is the road that crosses Beijing from North to South, lined by some of the city’s most important religious sites, passing right through the Forbidden City itself. This thoroughfare that connects the North up to the Zhengyangmen Gate, southern entrance of the Imperial Palace, was carved out by the Emperors to reach the Temple of Heaven on the Southern end of the Forbidden City, as well as the Drum Tower and the Bell Tower in the Northern part of the Forbidden City. It remains a highly important location today symbolically, considering that the National Stadium was built right along its path for the 2008 Olympics. By tracing a straight line from the stadium heading South, it not only cuts the Forbidden City and the Palace of Supreme Harmony right in half but - at least so it is the said - the Emperor’s Throne as well.

Chiara Vedovetto - © 2020 ARTE.it for Bulgari Hotel Beijing
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